Interior Landscape at Arion Press
Sep
6
to Nov 26

Interior Landscape at Arion Press

The multi-media installation, “Interior Landscape,” dwells upon the eco-poetics of place. Sculptures by Ashwini Bhat reference the Shiva lingam as Ardhanarishwara (an androgynous form of Shiva and Parvati that merges male and female forces of creativity). The lingams are deployed in a long curve that suggests the approach, in a South Indian temple, toward a central shrine. In this case, the central shrine is a larger lingam, set on a rotating pedestal that serves as a paleo-acoustical instrument. Its body (perhaps incised with a sharpened stick by its maker) is “read” by a laser in the manner of a record, releasing the ambient sounds—a dog barking, a man (Bhat’s father) singing, local crows—embedded in the wet clay at the moment when the lingam was shaped and scored.  


The poems by Forrest Gander are inspired by Sangam literature, a formal poetry developed in South India between 300 BC and 300 AD in which personal emotions are expressed in relation to particular landscapes—forest, mountains, desert, etc. The two dimensional drawings made from charcoal, watercolor, powdered raw and fired clay record Bhat’s visual responses to Gander’s poems. The large photographs by Bhat are of the shore temple of Mahabalipuram. 


The video, filmed and produced by Gander, brings together most of the influences for the exhibition which is designed as an immersive sacral experience that invites viewers to cross borders of time, culture, and geography via the most intimate of gestures: the poetic word, a landscape, the touch of a finger in clay, prayer, meditation, and the shifting rhythmic pulse between them. 


In a time of critical environmental degradation, this installation calls our attention to the way human life is embedded in place and time and to the interrelation of those mutual realms that have been misguidedly labeled human and nature.

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The Sierra Fund's "Art at the Edge of Extraction"
Oct
16
6:00 PM18:00

The Sierra Fund's "Art at the Edge of Extraction"

  • The Gold Miners Inn Conference Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Who: The Sierra Fund warmly invites community members and the interested public to join us alongside multidisciplinary technical experts and creatives for an evening of art at the nexus of science as we work to address legacy impacts of the California Gold Rush.

What: Evening art reception to launch the fifth biannual Reclaiming the Sierra (RTS) Conference being convened by The Sierra Fund. RTS 2019: Headwater Mercury Source Reduction is a conference to catalyze action around a regional strategy to abate the impacts of mercury from the Sierra to the sea. The evening reception will include appetizers and a no-host bar. Donation at the door of $25 is requested from non-conference attendees.

When: Wednesday October 16, 2019, from 6:00 – 9:00 pm.

Where: The Gold Miners Inn Conference Room, located at 121 Bank Street, Grass Valley, California.

Why: The 19th century Gold Rush forever changed the trajectory of what it means to live in California’s headwaters. Greed, brutality, and brilliance reshaped the people, the culture, and the land of the Sierra Nevada. From genocide to environmental destruction, the raw display of how human ingenuity can pull gold from living earth humbles and awes – and inspires creativity across disciplines as communities work to restore ecosystem and community resiliency to a place of unsurpassed beauty and ecological value.

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Details: Art at the Edge of Extraction is an opportunity to experience painting, sculpture, photography, song, and written and spoken word of artists who aim to provoke audience contemplation and commentary on the effects of resource extraction. Featured works reflect on the splendor of forests and watersheds ravaged in the quest for gold, force introspection about cultural resilience, and challenge our ability to connect abstract data to visual and figurative representations of watershed-wide impacts.

Future: Art at the Edge of Extraction is The Sierra Fund’s inaugural art event, aimed to expand the dimensionality of discourse about Gold Rush impacts and provoke community reflection on how the legacy of mining has shaped the land and people of the region. The reception is an opportunity for local artists to connect their work to a larger movement and upcoming international art event, Extraction: Art on the Edge of the Abyss. The “Ruckus” calls for and lays out the case for an international creative statement by artists about extraction.

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Artist Talk: Ashwini Bhat
Oct
15
6:30 PM18:30

Artist Talk: Ashwini Bhat

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Join Petaluma-based ceramist Ashwini Bhat for an artist talk and guided walk through the current exhibition in the gallery: “Interior Landscape”, a collaboration between Bhat and Pulitzer Prize winning writer Forrest Gander. Exploring the structure of Tamil Sangam poetry, South-Indian temple architecture, and paleo-acoustics, “Interior Landscape” invites viewers to cross borders of time, culture, and geography via the most intimate of gestures: the touch of a finger in clay, love poems in and out of translation, prayer, meditation, and rhythmic pulse. The exhibition is open every weekday, 9-5, through November 26. RSVP here.


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Extraction: Nevada Museum of Art
May
11
to Sep 22

Extraction: Nevada Museum of Art

May 11, 2019 - September 22, 2019

INA MAE AND RAYMOND RUDE GALLERY | FLOOR 2

The Nevada Museum of Art is known, in part, for its permanent collection that includes artworks with a thematic focus on how humans interact with natural, built, and virtual environments. For many artists, this means responding to how landscapes change as a result of using natural resources to power the world. Today, energy resources are classified as either renewable or non-renewable—and include everything from water, air, coal, minerals and forests, to wind, geothermal, and solar.

The works on view in this exhibition often reveal what is hidden from everyday view: the massive industrial infrastructure needed to power life in the twenty-first century. Increasingly, visual artists have turned their attention to lesser-known sociocultural impacts that such large-scale operations bring about. Taken together, these artistic responses bear witness to the complex system of exchange required for the extraction, collection, storage, and transmission of natural resources.

This exhibition is designed to address the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. In grades six through twelve, students are required to explore Human Impacts on Earth Systems. By engaging with the works and themes in this exhibition, students are presented with opportunities to evaluate, explain, debate, and analyze the management and use of our natural resources, and the impacts of human activities on natural systems.

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